First, concrete does not “dry.” It is a chemical reaction called “curing.” Concrete “cures” by incorporating water from the mix into crystals. As these crystals grow, the concrete gets stronger, and some excess water may be forced out. Some water should be allowed to remain so the process can fully go to completion. The complete process takes about a month.

First, concrete does not “dry.” It is a chemical reaction called “curing.” Concrete “cures” by incorporating water from the mix into crystals. As these crystals grow, the concrete gets stronger, and some excess water may be forced out. Some water should be allowed to remain so the process can fully go to completion. The complete process takes about a month.

The water used to mix the concrete will evaporate naturally. Do not use a De-Humidifier for this, as it will pull the moisture out too quickly, and possibly increase cracking. Dehumidifier use should start 30+ days after project completion.

Some of the moisture you are seeing is condensation from the air. In addition to the normal “sweating” that occurs is the fact that cool air and water are now being transported directly under the concrete. This exacerbates the “sweating” and is commonly misdiagnosed as a leak or a failure of the system. Rest assured it will subside quickly. Moreover, should anything be wrong, the system is completely under warranty and any actual problem would be corrected.

In Summation:

1. Sweating is normal and will subside after 30-days

2. Do not run a dehumidifier for 30-days as this may cause increased cracking

3. Waterproofing systems can produce larger than normal sweating due to the cool air and water running underneath

Digging deeper into the curing process, hydration is the chemical process that allows concrete to go from a plastic state to a hardened state while gaining strength over time. Hydration occurs at a faster rate in the early stages after concrete placement and slows down after a month.

If you would like more information regarding the process of curing please visit the link below.

http://www.cement.org/learn/concrete-technology/concrete-construction/curing-in-construction

In closing, we truly want to thank you for your business and we hope that this information helps. Lastly, should an actual problem exist, we will correct it. That said, this phenomenon will pass.